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  • Writer's pictureLyns Romano

Strength Routine 'A'

Updated: May 1

In recent years, strength training has gained popularity within the running community becoming a staple in an athletes' training program. It is widely accepted that incorporating strength training into a runner's routine is crucial for minimizing the risk of injury and can have potential benefits to overall performance.


Strength training supports the muscles, tendons, and ligaments, making them more resilient to the stresses of running. It can help to address imbalances and weaknesses, particularly in areas that are prone to injury among runners, such as the knees, hips, and lower back. By improving muscle strength, mobility, and joint stability, runners can significantly reduce their risk of common injuries. 


Incorporating strength workouts, especially those focusing on the lower body and core, can lead to better running economy. This means runners use less energy to maintain a given pace, making their running more efficient. Strength training enhances neuromuscular coordination, allowing for more powerful and efficient muscle contractions. With improved strength, runners can maintain optimal form even when fatigued, leading to better performance in both training and races.


Strength training contributes to increased muscular power, which is essential for faster running.  Exercises like squats, lunges, and plyometrics boost the force with which the foot can push off the ground, which can translate to faster speeds and improved performance over various distances.


Incorporating appropriately designed strength training programs is a beneficial addition to the distance runner's training arsenal.


Below is a sample strength routine. Please be aware that strength training, while beneficial, should be tailored to an individual’s fitness level, running goals, and overall health. The exercises and routine suggested here are general recommendations and may not be suitable for everyone.


Start with the warm-up followed by 2 supersets done 3 times, alternating between the 3 exercises.


Warm-up (videos below):

- Lunge Matrix (front, lateral, reverse): 1 x 3 on each leg

- Single Leg Hip Bridge: 1 x 10 on each leg

- Lateral Band Walks: 1 x 10 in each direction

- Donkey Whips: 1 x 10 on each leg

- T-Spine Rotations: 1 x 10 on each side


LUNGE MATRIX:


SINGLE LEG HIP BRIDGE:


LATERAL BAND WALKS:


DONKEY WHIPS:


T-SPINE ROTATIONS:


Superset A (videos below):

- Squats w. or without dumbbells: 3 x 8

- Single Leg Deadlift: 3 x 8 on each leg

- Bent Knee Side Plank:  3 x 8 on each side


SQUATS:



SINGLE LEG DEADLIFT:



BENT KNEE SIDE PLANK:


Superset B:

-Reverse Lunge

-Banded Knee Flexion

-Calf Eccentric Raises: 3 x 10 on each leg




REVERSE LUNGE:



BAND KNEE FLEXION:


CALF RAISE:




Disclaimer: The information provided in this strength training guide is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Before beginning any new exercise program, including the strength training routine outlined here, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider, a qualified fitness or running coach, or a physical therapist, especially if you have any pre-existing health conditions, concerns, or specific training needs.


Strength training, while beneficial, should be tailored to an individual’s fitness level, running goals, and overall health. The exercises and routine suggested here are general recommendations and may not be suitable for everyone. Always listen to your body, adjust the intensity and volume as needed, and seek professional guidance to ensure the exercises are performed correctly and safely. Skyline Run Coaching and its affiliates are not responsible for any injuries or health problems that may result from following this guide. Remember, the goal is to enhance your running performance and health, not to push through pain or discomfort.


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